Concordance Exercise

Published May 19, 2012 by ummihartini

More than 40 years ago, in August 1963, Martin Luther King electrified America with his momentous ‘I Have A Dream’ speech, dramatically delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

His soaring rhetoric demanding racial justice and an integrated society became a mantra for the black community and is as familiar to subsequent generations of Americans as the US Declaration of Independence. His words proved to be a touchstone for understanding the social and political upheaval of the time and gave the nation a vocabulary to express what was happening.

Anaphora (repeating words at the beginning of neighbouring clauses) is a commonly used rhetorical device. Repeating the words twice sets the pattern, and further repetitions emphasize the pattern and increase the rhetorical effect.

ANALYSIS OF PHRASE

Repeatition of phrase ”with this faith”

“With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.”(paragraph 26)

King repeated the phrase “with this faith” three times in his speech. What did he mean for the phrase was their hope of being FREEDOM in their own land.  He believed that all people are created equal and, although not the case in America at the time, King felt it must be the case for the future. He argued passionately and powerfully. King was trying very hard to persuade the people and nation to follow him.

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